The Federal Reserve’s Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility (“PPPLF”) is now available to non-bank PPP lenders to finance Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans that they originated or purchased.  While the PPPLF was previously only available to depository institutions to finance PPP loans that they originated, the Federal Reserve revised its eligibility criteria on April 30, 2020 to provide funding to all Small Business Administration (“SBA”) approved lenders.[1]  Terms of the PPPLF are discussed in our earlier blog post.

Continue Reading PPPLF Now Open to Non-Banks and for Purchased PPP Loans

Non-bank lenders providing struggling small businesses a lifeline through forgivable Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans may soon have access to the Federal Reserve’s Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility (“PPPLF”) to support their lending operations.  The Federal Reserve issued a term sheet for the PPPLF on April 9, 2020, indicating its intention to provide capital to lenders participating in the flagship small business relief program established by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Stability (“CARES”) Act by extending credit secured by  PPP loans on a short-term basis at favorable economic terms.[1]  The PPPLF is only available to finance PPP loans originated by the PPP lender. While the PPPLF is currently only available to depository institutions, the Federal Reserve has now announced that it is working to provide access to other PPP lenders “as soon as possible.”[2]

Continue Reading Federal Reserve Signals Progress Toward Desperately Needed Non-Bank Access to Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility (PPPLF)

The SBA’s Paycheck Protection Program, a $349 billion loan guaranty program established by the CARES Act to provide deferrable, forgivable loans up to $10 million to small business owners addressed in more detail in prior Mayer Brown posts regarding the statutory provisions and the SBA’s Interim Final Rule, launched April 3, 2020. In the initial days after the program launch, hundreds of thousands of applications were submitted, but borrowers and lenders alike continued to have questions about key aspects of the program.

On April 6, 2020, the SBA clarified certain issues in new
Continue Reading SBA Issues New Official FAQs for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Addressing Borrower Eligibility, Affiliation, Underwriting, and Updates to Previously Submitted Applications

The Small Business Administration (SBA) released an interim final rule the evening of April 2 outlining key provisions of the SBA’s Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) and the provisions of the CARES Act relating to loan forgiveness. The rule is effective immediately.

Some highlights of the rule include:

Increase in interest rate. The interest rate on any PPP loan will be
Continue Reading SBA Releases Guidance on PPP Small Business Loans

On March 31, 2020, the U.S. Department of the Treasury issued guidance on the Payroll Protection Program (PPP) under the CARES Act.  The PPP provides small business with funds to pay payroll costs, including employee benefits.  The funds can also be used to pay interest on mortgages, rent and utilities.  The specific guidance issued included

On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) was signed into law. Among other things, the CARES Act creates the “Paycheck Protection Program” (PPP), which provides up to $349 billion to expand the Small Business Administration’s (SBA’s) existing 7(a) loan program to support new loan guarantees and subsidies. The terms of the PPP are described in more detail here.

The CARES Act allows the SBA and the Secretary of the Treasury to authorize additional lenders to make paycheck protection loans if they determine such additional lenders have the necessary qualifications to process, close, disburse and service loans made with the guaranty of the SBA. Details regarding the application process are expected to be provided in the next week. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin publicly stated in an interview with Fox News yesterday that he “expects to have a program up on Friday.”


Continue Reading Potential for Fintech Lenders and other “Additional Lenders” to enter the SBA Market: What Lenders Need to Know

On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) was signed into law.

Among other things, the CARES Act creates the “Paycheck Protection Program,” which provides up to $349 billion to expand the Small Business Administration’s (SBA’s) existing 7(a) loan program to support new loan guarantees and subsidies. Highlights of the program include:
Continue Reading Small Business Loans under the CARES Act