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On Friday, the United States Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) finalized a regulation regarding the “Permissible Interest on Loans that are Sold, Assigned, or Otherwise Transferred” by national banks and federal savings associations. Initially proposed in November 2019, the regulation provides that interest on a loan that is permissible under provisions of

On April 30, 2020, the Federal Reserve Board announced expanded loan offerings and terms for the forthcoming Main Street Lending Program. Among other changes, Main Street is now open to larger businesses with up to 15,000 employees or $5 billion in 2019 annual revenue (previously up to 10,000 employees or $2.5 billion in 2019 annual

The Federal Reserve’s Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility (“PPPLF”) is now available to non-bank PPP lenders to finance Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans that they originated or purchased.  While the PPPLF was previously only available to depository institutions to finance PPP loans that they originated, the Federal Reserve revised its eligibility criteria on April 30, 2020 to provide funding to all Small Business Administration (“SBA”) approved lenders.[1]  Terms of the PPPLF are discussed in our earlier blog post.

Continue Reading PPPLF Now Open to Non-Banks and for Purchased PPP Loans

Non-bank lenders providing struggling small businesses a lifeline through forgivable Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans may soon have access to the Federal Reserve’s Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility (“PPPLF”) to support their lending operations.  The Federal Reserve issued a term sheet for the PPPLF on April 9, 2020, indicating its intention to provide capital to lenders participating in the flagship small business relief program established by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Stability (“CARES”) Act by extending credit secured by  PPP loans on a short-term basis at favorable economic terms.[1]  The PPPLF is only available to finance PPP loans originated by the PPP lender. While the PPPLF is currently only available to depository institutions, the Federal Reserve has now announced that it is working to provide access to other PPP lenders “as soon as possible.”[2]

Continue Reading Federal Reserve Signals Progress Toward Desperately Needed Non-Bank Access to Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility (PPPLF)

As discussed in a previous post, Section 4003 of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or the CARES Act, authorizes $500 billion of liquidity to support businesses, states and municipalities “related to losses incurred as a result of coronavirus.”  It can be expected that a portion of the liquidity authorized by Section 4003

In a development with potential relevance for leveraged borrowers and, by extension, the CLO market, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or the CARES Act, was signed into law by President Trump on March 27, 2020. The CARES Act provides for liquidity support for both large and mid-size businesses that, unlike the Primary

On Monday, March 23, 2020, in response to the evolving economic crisis created by the COVID-19 epidemic, U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve authorized the establishment of two new facilities to support credit for large employers:

  • The Primary Market Corporate Credit Facility (PMCCF) will provide credit for new bond and loan issuance by directly purchasing eligible corporate bonds from investment grade issuers.
  • The Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facility (SMCCF) will provide liquidity for outstanding corporate bonds and eligible exchange-traded funds (ETFs) by buying corporate bonds and ETFs in the secondary market.

The Federal Reserve will use authority granted by Section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act to lend to the SPV to support the vehicle’s purchases. The programs were approved by the U.S. Treasury in initial amounts of $10 billion, with funds provided from Treasury’s Exchange Stabilization Fund (ESF). SMCCF and PMCCF were not used during the 2008 financial crisis.


Continue Reading US Treasury and Federal Reserve Announce Two New Corporate Credit Facilities for Large Employers

The disruptions in economic conditions caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are reaching the commercial paper and longer term debt capital  markets.  The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Federal Reserve) has already set into motion three separate facilities as part of its effort to facilitate credit and help alleviate collateral volatility

Since its adoption in 2010, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s (the “FDIC”) securitization safe harbor rule, 12 C.F.R. § 360.6 (the “Rule”), which relates to the treatment of financial assets transferred in connection with a securitization or participation transaction, has required that securitization documents require compliance with Regulation AB of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), 17 C.F.R. §§ 229.1100 et. seq. (“Regulation AB”) even in circumstances where Regulation AB by its terms would not apply to the issuance of obligations backed by such financial assets.   On January 30, 2020, the FDIC finalized and adopted changes (the “Adopted Change”) to certain provisions of the Rule to eliminate such requirement where Regulation AB would not otherwise apply to the related securitization transaction.  
Continue Reading FDIC Adopts Changes to Securitization Safe Harbor Rule

A United States Magistrate Judge for the United States District Court, Western District of New York, today issued his report and recommendation on the defendants’ motion to dismiss in Petersen et al. v. Chase Card Funding, LLC et al., No. 1:19-cv-00741 (W.D.N.Y. June 6, 2019).  The Magistrate Judge recommended dismissal of both the plaintiffs’ usury and unjust enrichment claims on preemption grounds, stating that “the preemption analysis boils down to this: does the application of New York’s usury statutes to these defendants ‘prevent’ or ‘significantly interfere’ with Chase USA’s power to sell or assign the receivables generated by its credit card accounts?”.  The Magistrate Judge answered this question in the affirmative, reasoning that “since applying New York’s usury statutes to defendants would prevent Chase USA’s ability to sell or assign the receivables from its credit card accounts, they are preempted.”

Continue Reading Magistrate Judge Recommends Dismissal in Chase Issuance Trust Usury Lawsuit