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On March 31, 2020, the U.S. Department of the Treasury issued guidance on the Payroll Protection Program (PPP) under the CARES Act.  The PPP provides small business with funds to pay payroll costs, including employee benefits.  The funds can also be used to pay interest on mortgages, rent and utilities.  The specific guidance issued included

On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) was signed into law. Among other things, the CARES Act creates the “Paycheck Protection Program” (PPP), which provides up to $349 billion to expand the Small Business Administration’s (SBA’s) existing 7(a) loan program to support new loan guarantees and subsidies. The terms of the PPP are described in more detail here.

The CARES Act allows the SBA and the Secretary of the Treasury to authorize additional lenders to make paycheck protection loans if they determine such additional lenders have the necessary qualifications to process, close, disburse and service loans made with the guaranty of the SBA. Details regarding the application process are expected to be provided in the next week. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin publicly stated in an interview with Fox News yesterday that he “expects to have a program up on Friday.”


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On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) was signed into law.

Among other things, the CARES Act creates the “Paycheck Protection Program,” which provides up to $349 billion to expand the Small Business Administration’s (SBA’s) existing 7(a) loan program to support new loan guarantees and subsidies. Highlights of the program include:
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On January 30, 2020, five federal financial regulatory agencies published the long awaited notice of proposed rulemaking (the “NPR”) to revise certain aspects of the Volcker Rule (Section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act) with respect to the treatment of covered funds.  The NPR follows over 2 ½ years of the agencies’ consideration of changes to the Volcker Rule, which was originally prompted by the June 2017 Treasury Report that solicited changes to ease the compliance burden on banks.  The NPR includes several changes
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Today, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the National Credit Union Administration and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (collectively, the Agencies) issued an Interagency Statement on the use of alternative data in credit underwriting and the consumer protection implications

As expected following yesterday’s action by the US Office of the Comptroller of the Currency,1 at today’s board meeting2 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the board proposed a rule to clarify Federal interest rate authority to address marketplace uncertainty regarding the enforceability of the interest rate terms of loan agreements following a bank’s assignment of a loan to a non-bank, including confusion resulting from a recent decision from the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (Madden v. Midland Funding, LLC).3 The FDIC’s proposal would codify legal guidance on which the agency has relied for more than 20 years regarding interest rates that may be charged by State-chartered banks and insured branches of foreign banks.

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Transactions in the collateralized loan obligation (“CLO”) market have generally included some form of LIBOR replacement provisions for over a year, stemming from the announcement in July 2017 by Andrew Bailey, the head of the UK Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), that the FCA intended to phase out LIBOR in its present form by the end

On April 25th, the Alternative Reference Rates Committee, an advisory committee of the New York Federal Reserve Bank (ARRC), released recommended contractual fallback language for U.S. dollar LIBOR denominated floating rate notes and syndicated loans.

This language is part of ARRC’s mandate to help resolve issues with contracts that reference LIBOR.  The ARRC recommends