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The SBA’s Paycheck Protection Program, a $349 billion loan guaranty program established by the CARES Act to provide deferrable, forgivable loans up to $10 million to small business owners addressed in more detail in prior Mayer Brown posts regarding the statutory provisions and the SBA’s Interim Final Rule, launched April 3, 2020. In the initial days after the program launch, hundreds of thousands of applications were submitted, but borrowers and lenders alike continued to have questions about key aspects of the program.

On April 6, 2020, the SBA clarified certain issues in new
Continue Reading SBA Issues New Official FAQs for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Addressing Borrower Eligibility, Affiliation, Underwriting, and Updates to Previously Submitted Applications

The Small Business Administration (SBA) released an interim final rule the evening of April 2 outlining key provisions of the SBA’s Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) and the provisions of the CARES Act relating to loan forgiveness. The rule is effective immediately.

Some highlights of the rule include:

Increase in interest rate. The interest rate on any PPP loan will be
Continue Reading SBA Releases Guidance on PPP Small Business Loans

On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) was signed into law.

Among other things, the CARES Act creates the “Paycheck Protection Program,” which provides up to $349 billion to expand the Small Business Administration’s (SBA’s) existing 7(a) loan program to support new loan guarantees and subsidies. Highlights of the program include:
Continue Reading Small Business Loans under the CARES Act

A United States Magistrate Judge for the United States District Court, Western District of New York, today issued his report and recommendation on the defendants’ motion to dismiss in Petersen et al. v. Chase Card Funding, LLC et al., No. 1:19-cv-00741 (W.D.N.Y. June 6, 2019).  The Magistrate Judge recommended dismissal of both the plaintiffs’ usury and unjust enrichment claims on preemption grounds, stating that “the preemption analysis boils down to this: does the application of New York’s usury statutes to these defendants ‘prevent’ or ‘significantly interfere’ with Chase USA’s power to sell or assign the receivables generated by its credit card accounts?”.  The Magistrate Judge answered this question in the affirmative, reasoning that “since applying New York’s usury statutes to defendants would prevent Chase USA’s ability to sell or assign the receivables from its credit card accounts, they are preempted.”

Continue Reading Magistrate Judge Recommends Dismissal in Chase Issuance Trust Usury Lawsuit